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Student Equity Executive Summary 2019-22

Santiago Canyon College recognizes the importance of equity and the college is committed to ensuring tenets of equity are paramount to the development and integration of all campus-wide plans, procedures, and policies. The college established a Student Equity Committee and was part of the participatory governance structure. In 2015, this Student Equity Committee and the Student Success Committee merged to provide a more seamless and collaborative effort between the Student Equity and Student Success and Support Program, and the BSI Work Group, creating the Student Success and Equity Committee (SS&EC).

In the Fall of 2016, with guidance from the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office (CCCCO), the program leaders for SCC's multiple success initiatives (SSSP, SSSP Noncredit, BSI, BSIT, ABG Block Grant, Strong Workforce, and Student Equity) met to develop a plan to integrate our initiatives based on common goals shared by the programs. In the Spring of 2017, with a formal template provided, the program leaders of the four programs identified by the CCCCO (SSSP, SSSP Noncredit, BSI, and Student Equity) met to begin the development of a plan that would integrate the goals, activities, and programs of the four initiatives. This served as the genesis for SCC's Integrated Plan which was submitted at the end of the fall semester, 2017.

In the Fall of 2018, it was announced that the Chancellor's Office would formally merge the four programs into one program called the Student Equity and Achievement (SEA) Program, but would still require the development of a standalone equity plan. The Chancellor's Office provided new “success metrics" to identify disproportionate impact, and a new dashboard by which to pull data from. SCC, however, faces a singular challenge in deriving meaningful analysis of disproportionate impact in some of the metrics due to deficiencies and idiosyncrasies in our MIS submission data, especially the fact that we combine reporting of credit and noncredit students.  The Chancellor's Office, provided direction to create activities utilizing guided pathways as a framework. In the spring of 2019, the template, and the general student data and equity data were released. Campus researchers drew down the data on state-mandated target populations from the Chancellor's Office dashboard. The data was cleaned and used in the development of strategies that address the gaps found under the five success metrics.

A call was placed to SCC's campus community to request activities that would serve to reduce the achievement gap for students identified in the data. A subgroup of the Student Success and Equity Committee met to review and suggest activities for inclusion in the equity plan. A draft of the plan was then reviewed by shared governance committees (Student Success & Equity, Academic Senate, and College Council) for editing and approval. Once the plan was approved by campus constituency groups, it was submitted to the RSCCD Board of Trustees for approval and submitted to the Chancellor's Office, via the NOVA Portal. .

Target Populations

Based on the data pulled from the Chancellor's Office dashboard, multiple student groups were found to achieve success at lower rates than those who are in the highest performing groups. As a result, goals and activities have been created to address the gaps for the following student groups:

All Female and Male students who identify as: Black or African American, Asian, Filipino, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, Hispanic or Latino, Native American/Alaskan, Foster Youth, Veterans, Low-Income, and LGBT

All Female and Male students who have an identified disability

It should be noted that while disproportionate impact could not be measured for specific student groups because their numbers are too small under a few success metrics, SCC acknowledges these students' place within the state legislation, and will continue to monitor and provide services to ensure their success in all areas (i.e. Students who identify as Black or African American, Native American/Alaskan, foster youth, homeless, LGBT, and veterans).

SCC will also make a commitment to support students who are not identified in the equity legislation, but that may need additional assistance. Through the equity plan, a request will be made to the RSCCD Board of Trustees to include single parents, undocumented students and formerly incarcerated students in the research agenda and for potential inclusion as targeted student groups in the equity plan.

Goals

The following goals were established to guide the change necessary to reduce equity gaps for all students identified in the plan.

Access: Successful Enrollment (Enrolled in the Same Community College)

SCC will increase access for students identified in the equity plan by reducing equity gaps 40% through strategic and continuous planning and evaluation.

Retention: Fall to Spring (at the Same Community College)

SCC will decrease equity gaps by 40% among students identified in the equity plan and continue to monitor and address disparities for these students.

Transfer to a Four-Year Institution

SCC will decrease equity gaps by 40% for students transferring to 4-year institutions.

Completed Both Transfer-Level Math and English (within the District)

SCC will reduce transfer-level course completion equity gaps by 40% among students identified in the equity plan.

Attained the Vision Goal Completion Definition (Earned Credit Certificate over 18 Units, Associate Degree, CCC Bachelor's Degree)

SCC will decrease degree and certificate completion equity gaps by 40% for underrepresented student groups identified in the equity plan.

Activities

Santiago Canyon College has developed activities using an array of currently implemented programs, as well as by identifying areas where new support services, professional development, and curriculum enhancement may be needed in order to address the disproportionate impacts that the data revealed.  The following activities are noted for each indicator: 

Access:

ActivitiesStart / End DateFunding
A1. Support Outreach Department in the recruitment of disproportionately impacted student groups. ​ ​
a) Continue funding a dedicated part-time staff member to support High School and Community Outreach operations and activities related to equity-identified student groups.2019-2022$30,363
b) Continue supporting the EOPS Summer Success Program by providing books and instructional supplies for students who participate.2019-2022$12,000
A2. Continue supporting programs that provide pre-enrollment services, and transition support to disproportionately impacted students at SCC. ​ ​
a) Continue expansion of Early Welcome, and Family Night which will orient new students in under-represented equity groups to college-wide specialized services that address their unique needs2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity
b) Continue support of Summer Advantage transition program from high school to college for students identified in the access section of the equity plan.  2019-2022$10,000
c. Support undocumented students and their families transition to higher education by providing a “Dreamer Conference".2019-2022$3,000
A3. Assist students in noncredit, complete courses and transition to the credit side.  ​ ​
a) Fund a tutoring program for noncredit students.2019-2022$20,000

 

​Retention from Fall to Spring

ActivitiesStart / End DateFunding
B1. Offer Priority Counseling to disproportionately impacted student groups. ​ ​
a) Offer priority counseling appointments available to foster youth, veterans, and low-income for the development of education plans, and students needing Financial Aid Counselor Approvals.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity

 

Transfer to Four-Year Institution


ActivitiesStart / End DateFunding
C1. Support the transfer success for impacted student groups. ​
​ ​
a) Offer specialized transfer workshops and a transfer event for EOPS / CARE / CalWORKS students, including visits to 4-year universities each semester.2019-2022$22,000
b) Continue exploration of participation in Summer Scholars Transfer Institute (SSTI) at the University of California, Irvine.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity
C2. Offer incentives for equity identified students completing their educational goals at SCC. ​ ​​
a) Fund a Transfer and Student Success Banquet2019-2022
$3,000
C2. Provide opportunities for students to learn about the transfer process. ​ ​
a) Fund transportation and registration cost for students attending the STOMP Conference. 2019-2022$1,300

 

Completed Transfer-Level Math and English

ActivitiesStart / End DateFunding
B1. Expand tutoring services to disproportionately impacted students. ​ ​
a) Continue providing students with individualized computer-assisted instruction through instructional support centers and services to help them improve their basic skills.2019-2022$5,000
b) Explore effectiveness of embedded tutoring model as a high impact practice to support disproportionately impacted students.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity

 

Certificate & Degree Completion

​Activities Focused on Certificate and Degree Completion fell into other success metrics as well, and are described below, in section F. 

 

College Initiatives that Cover Several Success Metrics

ActivitiesStart / End DateFunding
F1. Maintain a research agenda to identify disproportionately impacted students, and the barriers that may keep them from being successful. Also research students who have overcome barriers, and what resources and / or skill sets were necessary for them to succeed in spite of extenuating circumstances. ​ ​
a) Continue to monitor campus climate through research and surveys of faculty, staff, administrators, and students.2019-2022$15,000
b) Continue jointly funding Research Analysts through Student Equity and SSSP.2019-2022$80,545
c) Using new research software, integrate and disaggregate student achievement data into future Academic and Student Services Program Reviews.2019-2022$8,500
F2. Continue support for programs designed to assist in the success of equity identified student groups. ​ ​
a) Provide additional funding for textbooks, students through the EOPS / CARE / CalWORKs.2019-2022$35,000
F3. Continue support of foster youth programs designed to ensure the success of these equity-identified students. ​ ​
a) Provide resources and supplemental support in the form of books, instructional supplies, gas cards, and bus passes etc. to students who identify as foster youth to eliminate barriers for enrollment at SCC.2019-2022$0
b) Hold a pre-registration event to ensure foster youth are aware of priority registration dates and are prepared to register.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity
c) Contact and counsel foster youth at risk for not making satisfactory progress to ensure they know how to access intervention services.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity
d) Continue funding a dedicated part-time staff member to provide wrap-around support to students who identify as foster youth.2019-2022$33,799
e) Form an advisory group comprised of community-based foster youth service providers and college faculty, staff and administrators to provide guidance and direction in the development of foster youth services.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity
f) Designate a foster youth liaison in each Student Service office to facilitate the provision of support services to this student population.2019-2022No Allocation Needed to Implement Activity
F4. Support veterans programs designed to ensure the success of these equity identified students. ​ ​
a) Hire a dedicated full-time staff member to support outreach, logistics and operations of the Veteran's Services Office.2019-2022$81,489
F5. Support Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS) to ensure the success of these equity identified students. ​ ​
c) Continue jointly funding a DSPS Counselor for the development of abbreviated and comprehensive education plans for students with disabilities seeking to earn a certificate, AA degree or transfer to a 4-year university.2019-2022$25,000
F6. Continue to develop and support equity-focused professional development opportunities to all of SCC's constituency groups. ​ ​
a) Provide faculty, staff, administrators, and students with professional development opportunities related to equity-mindedness, cultural competence and universal design, and instructional methods to accommodate student diversity and support the development of equity-based curriculum.2019-2022$25,000
F7. Continue supporting the Office of Student Equity and Success. ​ ​
a) Continue funding of director to oversee the Office of Student Equity and Success, as well as Student Equity Plan implementation and evaluation.2019-2022$140,671
b) Continue funding a dedicated part-time Budget Specialist to support Student Equity Office operations and activities.2019-2022$27,409
​F8. Continue supporting Supplemental Instruction. ​ ​
a) Continue funding supplemental instruction (SI) and faculty mentoring to foster student engagement and success in courses across disciplines.2019-2022$50,000
F10. Continue support the exploration of the development of OER courses. ​ ​
a) Provide support and resources for faculty interested in creating low-cost and or open source classes across departments and divisions.2019-2022No Allocation Needed for Implementation of Activity
F11. Continue support of equity faculty coordinators and team members ​ ​
a) Continue funding student equity faculty coordinator(s) to work collaboratively with the Student Equity Director.2019-2022$34,000
b) Fund division student equity faculty team leaders to work with the student equity faculty coordinators.2019-2022$30,000
F12. Continue support of the Instructional Design Center ​ ​
a) Continue to support the Instructional Design Center that will support faculty in offering high quality instruction to students in the classroom and online.  The Center will provide training, workshops, and technological support to faculty for the purpose of evaluating and refining instructional methods to accommodate SCC's diverse student population, as well as diverse learning styles within the classroom, and support the emergence of personalized learning experiences through adaptive learning methods.2019-2022No Allocation Needed for Implementation of Activity
F13. Continue support the development of a food pantry. ​ ​
a) Continue to support the development of a food pantry for students impacted by food insecurity at SCC by hiring a full-time student services coordinator.2019-2022$81,500
F14. Support recruitment of men of color into the teaching profession.  ​ ​
a) Work with partners at CSUF to recruit more men of color into SCC's Teacher Pathway Program.2019-2022$2,000
F15. Support the development of an Umoja Program at SCC.  ​ ​
a) Fund a short-term specialist to recruit and provide services through the Umoja Program. 2019-2022$16,200
F16. Expand the number of student groups supported by student equity initiative   ​ ​
a) Include single parents, undocumented students and formerly incarcerated students in the research agenda and for potential inclusion as targeted student groups in the equity plan.2019-2022No Allocation Needed for Implementation of Activity

 

Progress Made in Achieving the Identified Goals from Prior Year Plans

ACCESS

Goal: SCC will maintain a commitment to increasing access for students identified in the equity plan through strategic and continuous planning and evaluation.

In 2014, SCC began studying disproportionate impact among students identified in the equity legislation. For the Success Indicator of Access, in addition to comparing our campus population to the service area population (as suggested by the Chancellor's Office), our Office of Institutional Effectiveness looked at where first-time students were placing in English, Math, and Reading. By looking at proportions of each subgroup placing into transfer-level courses in Math, English and Reading based on placement scores, instead of a simple population comparison, we were able to see who was disproportionately impacted by the placement exam, and where support was needed as students entered the college.

In the 2017-18 academic year, there was no data collected on BSI course completion. Due to AB705, SCC began to utilize the self-guided placement model, and as a result reduced the number of students taking developmental courses. It should also be noted, that with the change in the name and definition of metrics, how we look at and measure access will change, so the need to analyze population or placement data will be obsolete.

Fourteen activities were developed to focus on increasing enrollment of disproportionately impacted student groups from our service area. The main focus of support for this success indicator has been in the Outreach Department. Through the use of equity funds, SCC hired a 19 hour outreach specialist whose focus is to connect with groups identified in the equity plan. An allocation was provided for marketing materials, and funds were used to market the college in Spanish language and Vietnamese language newspapers. SCC is also working towards expanding on a high school to college bridge program in order to ease the transition into college life.

English Placement:

In 2014 and 2015, we found that African-American (-9.2%), Latino(-9.3%), those students that marked Other (-16.4%), students with identified disabilities (-12.3%), and low-income (-13.5%) students were not as successful as other groups when placing into transfer level English.

By 2017 (the final year for campus-wide placement testing) we saw improvement in the Other group (-14.7%) and Latinos (-12.1%), but the achievement gap between African American (-10.6%), students with identified disabilities (-27.6%), and low-income (-19.3%) students and the highest performing group increased.

Math Placement:

In 2014 and 2015, we found that African-American (-8.5%), Latino (-6.1%), students with identified disabilities (-14.2%), and low-income (-13.7%) students, were not as successful as other groups when placing into transfer level Math. By 2017, we saw a noticeable improvement among Latinos (-3.9%), and a smaller but notable improvement among African American students (-7.9%) and low-income students (8.4%). The achievement gap between students with identified disabilities (-21.2%) and the highest performing group increased.

Reading Placement:

In 2014 and 2015, we found that Latino (-6.1%) students, students with identified disabilities (-15.9%), and low-income (-11.5%) students were not as successful as other groups when placing into transfer level Reading.

By 2017, the achievement gap between Latino (-6.1%) students, students with identified disabilities (-21.8%) and the highest performing group increased. Low-income students (-10.4) showed some improvement.

It should be noted that some student populations showed disproportionate impact, but sample size was too small to be considered valid. For example, Foster Youth and Veterans did show disproportionate impact, and will continue to be supported as outlined in the equity legislation.

COURSE COMPLETION

Goal: SCC will increase the course completion rates among students identified in the equity plan and continue to monitor and address disparities identified among these students.

Eight activities were developed to focus on increasing course completion of disproportionately impacted student groups. The priority of this area has been to eliminate monetary barriers that might be impeding the student's success. Through the use of equity funds, SCC purchased 106 laptops/surface pros for student use. This has enabled students to complete class work, complete research, and stay up-to-date with information in regards to enrollment, financial aid, as well as classwork (blackboard). Student Equity has worked with the Disabled Students Programs and Services to ensure faculty and staff understand the diversity and uniqueness that students with disabilities bring to campus.

The large focus on professional development in SCC's equity plan has sought to increase faculty and staff awareness of strategies and promising practices for serving disproportionately impacted students.

In 2014 and 2015, we found that African-American (-5.6%), Pacific Islander(-8.6%), students with identified disabilities (-5.3%), foster youth (11.7%) and low-income (-5.1%) students were not as successful as other groups in completing courses at SCC.

By 2018, we saw improvement among Pacific Islander (7.9%), and students with identified disabilities (-1.5%).  The achievement gap between African American (-6.7%), foster youth (-16.6%), and low-income (-7.6%) students and the highest performing group increased.

As mentioned previously, due to the changing success metrics, this data will not be included or tracked in future iterations of SCC's equity plans.

 

BSI/ESL COMPLETION

Goal: SCC will develop and implement educational strategies that increase student success in ACE (ESL) and basic skills courses in Math, English and Reading for students identified in the student equity plan.

Nine activities were developed to focus on increasing ESL and basic skills course completion of disproportionately impacted student groups. Promising practices of acceleration and learning communities are removing barriers that may impede student success.

In 2014 and 2015, we found that African-American (-17.8%), Asian (-15.2%), and Male (8.9%) students were not as successful as other groups in completing developmental English courses. By 2018, we saw improvement in African American (-9.4%) and Asian (14%), and Male (-1.5%) students.

In 2014 and 2015, we found that African-American (-7.1%), and Latino (-4.8) students were not as successful as other groups in completing developmental Math courses. By 2018, we saw improvement in African American (-5.6%), and Latino (-4.1) students.

In 2014 and 2015, we did not find disproportionate impact among students completing developmental reading courses and that remained consistent through 2018.

As mentioned previously, due to the changing success metrics, this data will not be included or tracked in future iterations of SCC's equity plans.


CERTIFICATE AND DEGREE COMPLETION

Goal: SCC will increase degree and certificate completion rates in underrepresented student groups to achieve an equitable balance of degree and certificate attainment across all targeted student equity groups.

Six activities were developed to focus on increasing certificate and degree completion of disproportionately impacted student groups. Priority has been given to counseling, advising, and coaching of students to ensure student enrollment in appropriate courses for their educational pathway, application of learning strategies for successful course completion, and attainment of degrees and certificates.

In 2014 and 2015, we found that Latino (-5.6%), students with identified disabilities (-5.7%), foster youth (-12), and low-income (-9.4%) students were not as successful as other groups in completing certificates and degrees. By 2018, we saw improvement in Latino (-2.4%), students with identified disabilities (2.5%), foster youth (-2.8) and low-income (-2.0) students but African American students (-4.5%), who showed success in previous years, were now showing disproportionate impact.

Due to the change in the definition of certificate and degree completion, it is likely that the students groups identified in this area will change as well.

 

TRANSFER

Goal: SCC will increase transfers to 4-year institutions among targeted equity groups.

Six activities were developed to focus on increasing university transfer of disproportionately impacted student groups. By expanding offerings including university campus visitations and overnight living experiences in dormitories, students have been afforded an experience designed to alleviate anxiety and show them that they also belong in these spaces. The Transfer Success Center was supported with resources to help market its services to students by increasing visibility and ability to “in-reach" to students on campus.

In 2014 and 2015, we found that Latino (-6.5%), students with identified disabilities (-13.7%), foster youth (20.9%) low-income (-12.8%), and veteran (-6.9%) students were not as successful as other groups in transferring to universities.

By 2018, we saw improvement for veterans (-1.5%) students. Unfortunately, most of the other student groups including; students with identified disabilities (-9.1%), foster youth (-16.0%) and low-income (-6.5%) students still remained disproportionately impacted. Males (-3.2) and American Indian/Alaskan Native (-5.7) who showed success in previous year, were now disproportionately impacted as well.

The students identified within this success metric will change due to the adjusted definition of transfer completion.

Accounting of Past Equity Budgets

 

Account TypeDescription of Account2015-162016-172017-18Total
1000Academic Salaries73,81676,75172,641223,208
2000Classified / Non-Academic Salaries239,130416,630397,0361,052,796
3000Employee Benefits94,023125,975170,371390,369
4000Supplies and Materials56,18241,72826,594124,504
5000Other Operating Expenses179,076144,042117,520440,638
6000Capital Outlay191,2091,5070192,716
7000Other Outgoing for Students69,76944,71396,941211,423
  903,232851,346881,1032,635,681

 

​Contact Information

 Joseph Alonzo                                  Director, Office of Student Equity and Success

714-628-5040                                    alonzo_joseph@sccollege.edu