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Career Exploration

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Career Exploration

Deciding on a career path can be challenging, but career counselors are here to help! 

The career exploration process includes self-assessment, researching careers, and "test driving" the career. These steps allow you to uncover more about yourself and discover occupations that will be a good fit for you. ​

Click the stages below to begin your career exploration journey! 

​​​​​​​​The first step in career exploration is getting to know more about yourself. You must learn about your own personality, interests, values, and strengths to find careers that will be a good fit for you. 

 

Here are some free online resources for career self-assessment: 

  • CareerOneStop - Comprehensive resource with online assessments on interests, personality, values, and skills. Also has career profiles, videos, and trends. 
  • Eureka​ ​- Complete online assessments through this site to measure your ​interests​​, personality, ​skills, learning style, ​and values. ​
    • ​Access Code: Create an account then use the site code OJL3DHQ
  • ​​​​​Roadtrip Nation - Career resource that begins with a personality and interest assessment. Has extensive information on careers including informational interview videos with professionals.
    • Access Code: SANTIAGO​ 
  • CA Career Zone - ​​Includes online assessments for interests, ​​personality, skills, and values. ​Also includes a tool to see what kind of income would be required based on your desired lifestyle. 
  • ONet Interest Profiler​ - Interest assessment that matches you with a Holland Interest Code. Links to the ONet online database where you can explore over 950 occupations. 

​For an in-depth assessment of your personality and/or interests, SCC's Career Services offers: 

  • ​​Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - This assessment measures your personality, and it connects you with careers that may align based on how you perceive the world and make decisions. 
  • Strong Interest Inventory (SII) - ​​​This assessment helps you match your interests with potential educational, career, and leisure activities, using an individual's preferences in a variety of areas to aid them in discovering what they'd most enjoy doing with their work and their free time.

To take the MBTI or SII, please reach out to Career Services! 

​​​​​​​​​​​Once you have a better understanding of who you are and what careers may be a good fit, it's time to do some research! ​​Here's some things to consider as you find out more information on each career: 

  • ​Does it align with your personality and interests?
  • What skills are required for this occupation?
    • ​What type of academic knowledge? Is there a specific level of education or degree needed?
    • What type of technical skills do you need?
    • What are the 'employability skills' you need? (i.e. time management, communication)
  • How is the job market for this occupation? Is it a growing field? Will there be a demand once you graduate? 
  • What is the salary (median and range) for this job? Does the salary align with the lifestyle you want? Is it higher in certain geographic areas? 
  • What does the "day-to-day" look like for this job? 
  • What is the work environment like for this job?
    • What types of commute or travel would be required? 
    • Are there physical requirements​ for this occupation? (Heavy lifting, standing, etc.) 
  • What kinds of experiences/education would help you be more competitive​ for this job? 
​As you research, we recommend using the following worksheet to keep track of the information you find: Career Research Worksheet

Online resources to help you research careers: ​
  • ONet Online ​- Detailed information on occupations including daily activities, skills and education needed, and salary 
  • Eureka - Overview of occupation including job function and education needed 
    • Access Code: Create an account then use the site code OJL3DHQ
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook​ - Career information on specific jobs including their outlook (job growth)
  • Salary Surfer - Generalized salary information based on degrees/programs ​offered at community colleges and universities 
  • Labor Market Info - (CA) California labor market information through the State of California EDD 
  • Labor Market Info - (USA) National labor market information through the US Labor Department 
Industry specific sites: 
  • Explore Health Careers​ - ​Extensive information on the all the careers related to health ​
  • Careers in Film - Career information for the film and media industry. ​​​
  • The Art Career Project ​- Career information for the arts including fine art, film, culinary, digital arts, performing arts, fashion, music, photography, and more. ​
  • Business Degrees - A resource to understand the different areas of concentration in business 

​​​​​​​Now that you know more about yourself and more about potential careers you're interested in - it's time to test drive the career! 

Just like you test drive a car before buying, it's important that you get hands on exposure to a career. Sometimes a career sounds great when you read about it, but you may realize it's not the best fit once you get first-hand experience. 

So how do you test drive a career? The following are strategies we suggest: 

Informational Interviews 

An informational interview is a an informal conversation you can have with someone working in a career or​ area of interest to you. It is an effective research tool and is best done after preliminary online research. It is not a job interview, and the objective is not to find job openings. If you feel awkward about asking someone for an informational interview, that's okay. However, informational interviews are a very normal request for professionals - and people generally don't mind talking about their own career journey with someone who is interested! Watch this video explaining more about informational interviews and some tips for navigating them: 

 


Getting Hands-On Experience 

Hands-on experience can be gained through professional work, internships, volunteering, and job shadowing. These allow you to see first-hand what an occupation is like. 

  • Professional work - Both part-time and full-time work that's related to your desired occupation. For example, if you wanted to eventually become a veterinarian, you could get a paid job working at the front desk at a veterinary clinic
  • Internships - Internships can be formal (with an application process) or informal (agreed upon by an employer and you). They can also be paid or unpaid. In some instances, you may be able to get college credit for an internship! 
  • Volunteering - Volunteer work can also be formal (through an organization) or informal, but it's always unpaid. 
  • Job shadowing - Think of job shadowing like an extended informational interview. Instead of just getting to talk with someone once about their career, you can spend time observing the life of a professional. This can give you an even greater understanding of the day-to-day tasks for an occupation. Check out this article​ with tips on job shadowing​. 
Additional Learning Opportunities 
  • ​​LinkedIn Learning - Free resource for SCC students! It provides mini-video courses taught by industry experts in software, creative, and business skills. Get started with LinkedIn Learning by:
    • ​Activate your free account.
      • Be sure to use your SCC student email address NOT your personal email
      • If you have issues getting logged in, contact career@sccollege.edu 

​​​​​Consider taking a class at SCC to help you with the career exploration process!

The courses we offer include: 

Counseling 101: Educational, Personal, Cultural, and Career Exploration (3 units)
  • Designed to promote academic and career success by exploring student development from an educational, sociological, psychological, and physiological perspective.  Exploration of higher education opportunities, potential career interests and a focus on educational planning.  Recommended for students planning to complete an associate degree, and/or to transfer to a university.
  • This course meets the general education requirement for the Associates Degree (Area F1) and CSU general education (Area E1).

Counseling 116: Career/Life Planning & Personal Exploration (3 units) 
  • This course is designed to assist students in successfully establishing and achieving education, career and life goals.  Students are guided through a reflective process that focuses on values, interests, personality, skills and learning styles.  Career and education options are researched, and students are exposed to college resources and support services.  Decision making models and goal setting techniques are examined and will be used to develop short and long term education, career and life plans.
  • ​​​This course meets the general education requirement for the Associate Degree (Area F1) and CSU general education (Area E1).

Counseling 118: Self Exploration & the Teaching Profession (2 units)
  • ​​​An exploration of "self" covering theories of values, interests, skills and personality as applied to the teaching profession.  Topics include culturally diverse student populations, career ladders and options, and academic preparation required for employment.  Students will develop an awareness of psychological and sociological forces within the workplace.  Career and life plans for the teaching profession or alternative career paths will be developed.​

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Pathway-Specific Career Resources 

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Major and Pre-Professional Guides 

Click below for information on popular career goals and majors: 

​​Untitled design (7).JPG​The following pre-professional guides are informational, and their purpose is to provide an introduction to the occupation and key resources. 

​Please keep in mind that any pre-requisite courses are general guidelines. It is your responsibility to research the requirements of the individual programs you're interested in. ​​

​​​Untitled design (6).pngBecoming a Lawyer

​A lawyer also called an attorney, gives legal advice to people, government agencies, and businesses. They offer representation when needed, prepare legal documents, and interpret laws, regulations, and rulings.

Is Law the Right Career for You?

Start by answering the following questions: 

  • Have you completed an informational interview with a current lawyer? 
  • Are you a disciplined, hard worker? 
  • Do you have strong analytical, research, and writing skills?
  • Are you willing to spend at least 7 years in college (4+ years for B.A./B.S. and 3 years in law school)? 

If you answered yes to these questions, a career in law may be a good fit for you!​

Holland Interest Code

The interest code for the law occupation is EI (Enterprising Investigative)

What's a Holland Code? This refers to a career assessment that measures your personality type across 6 areas: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. A Holland Code allows you to connect your personality directly with occupations! Find out your code at mynextmove.org/explore/ip​

Occupation Basics 

​Sample Job Titles 
​Median Wages
​Required Education
  • ​Environmental Lawyer
  • Family Lawyer
  • Immigration Lawyer
  • Judge​
​In CA: $71,550 - $171,550*

In LA/OC Area: $176,020

*Median wages in the law field differ significantly based on specialization and geographic area. For more information visit CareerOneStop.org/Salary​

​Doctorate Degree: 
  • Juris Doctor (J.D.)

Choosing a Major for Law 

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There is no required or preferred undergraduate major for law school. Instead, law schools look for an undergraduate background that sharpens analytical reasoning and writing skills. Consider a major that interests you and could lead to an alternate career, if necessary.

Preparing for Law School​

As an undergraduate student, there are several things you can do now to prepare for law school: 

  • Gain exposure to the law through volunteering, work, or job shadowing. 
  • Join a pre-law club, or start one if it doesn't already exist at your college. 
  • Study for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). 
  • Maintain a high GPA; grades are a major factor in the selection process. 
  • Connect with faculty and professionals. Remember, most programs will require a letter of recommendation. 
  • Acquire excellent research and writing skills.​

Applying to Law School​

Apply to law school programs using the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). This centralized application service also has a school directory with information on requirements and deadlines for various law programs. Visit lsac.org for more information.​

Professional Organizations​

Areas of Law​

There are many areas of law that you can specialize in. You are not expected to know the exact area of law you want to practice in before you attend law school. However, it is helpful to gain knowledge of the various areas of law as you decide your career path. Visit this website for an overview of each area of law: ​LSAC Fields of Law 

Related Occupations​

Not sure becoming a lawyer is the right fit for you? Here are some related careers with different educational requirements.​

​Job Title
​​Median Wages in CA
​Required Education
​Holland Code
​Arbitrator/Mediator 
​$97,430
​Bachelor's
​SE
​Paralegal/Legal Assistant
​$61,240
​Associate's
​CIE
​Court Reporter​​$89,990 
​Certificate 
​CE


Pre-Law Guide

​​​​Becoming a Medical Doctor
Modern medicine generally refers to clinical practice: the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease by a physician. There are three broad categories of physicians: primary care, surgeons, and specialists. Beyond the clinical practice of medicine, physicians can also research the science and technology of health care.

Is Medicine the Right Career for You?
Start by answering the following questions:
  • Do you enjoy learning about the human body and science?
  • Are you a disciplined, hard worker?
  • ​Would you enjoy a career where you interact with others (patients and colleagues)?
  • Are you willing to spend at least 8 years in college (4+ years for B.A./B.S. and 4 years in medical school)?
  • After your education, are you willing to spend another 3-7 years completing clinical training?

If you answered "yes" to these questions, a career in medicine may be a good fit for you!

Holland Interest Code 
The interest code for medical doctors varies by specialty. However, most positions include Investigative, Social, and Realistic interests. 
  • IS - Family and General Practitioners​ & Pediatricians  
  • ISR - OB/GYN, Dermatologists, & Neurologists 
  • IRS - Anesthesiologists ​ 
​What's a Holland Code? This refers to a career assessment that measures your personality type across 6 areas: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. A Holland Code allows you to connect your personality directly with occupations! Find out your code at mynextmove.org/explore/ip​

Choosing a Major for Medicine
There is no required undergraduate major for medical school, and “Pre-Medicine” is not a common undergraduate major. To apply to medical school, you will need to complete certain prerequisite courses in science and math. Therefore, common undergraduate majors for students interested in medicine include:
  • Biology, microbiology, molecular biology, genetics, or biochemistry
  • ​Math, physics, or chemistry

Sample Prerequisite Courses
In general, all prerequisite courses should be taken for a letter grade. Some campuses may have policies regarding whether the requirements can be met through community college coursework.​​

​​Common Med School Prerequisites 
​SCC Courses
​​One year of English
ENGL 101 & ENGL 102 or 103 ​
​One year of biology 
​​BIOL 211, 221, & 231
​​One year of general chemistry
​CHEM 200A & 200B 
​One year of organic chemistry
​​CHEM 280A & 280B
​One year of physics ​
​​PHYS 250A-C*

*Some campuses may accept PHYS 150A-B. Refer to program-specific websites.

IMPORTANT: This list is meant to be used as an informational guide. All students must refer to the individual campuses or programs for specific information on prerequisite requirements.


Preparing for Medical School
As an undergraduate student, there are several things you can do now to prepare for medical school:
  • ​​Maintain a high GPA.​
  • Clinical experience is not always required, but medical schools prefer students with relevant experience. This demonstrates an applicant’s knowledge and commitment to the field. Seek out volunteer and/or work experience in settings that involve close contact with patients, physicians, and other health professionals. Also, look into programs like:
  • For students interested in becoming a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, you need to gain an understanding of the Osteopathic philosophy. Many programs require a letter of recommendation from an Osteopathic Physician. You can find Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine through www.ospsc.org.
  • Join a pre-med club​​
  • Connect with faculty and professionals. Remember that most programs will require multiple letters of recommendation.
  • Study for the standardized test(s) required for the programs you will be applying to (i.e. MCAT).

Professional Organizations

Podcasts

​Related Occupations

Not sure becoming a physician is the right fit for you? Here are some related careers with different educational requirements. For more healthcare-related careers, visit ExploreHealthCareers.org.​

​Job Title

​Median Wages in CA

​Required Education

​Holland Code 

​Physician Assistant

​$118,500

​Master's Degree

​SIR

​Nurse Practitioner

​$126,890

​Master's Degree

​SIR​

​Registered Nurse

​$104,410

​Associate's Degree

​SIC

​Medical Assistant

​$36,080

​Certificate

​SCR


​​​​Becoming a Dentist 9.png

Dentists provide a wide range of oral health care services that contribute to the general health and quality of their patients’ lives. They are at the forefront of new​​ developments in dental implants, computer-generated imaging, and cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Dentists are instrumental in the early detection of oral cancer and other conditions of the mouth.

Is Dentistry the Right Career for You? 

Start by answering the following questions:

  • Do you enjoy learning about the human body and science?
  • Are you a disciplined, hard worker?
  • Are you comfortable with close personal contact?\nDo you enjoy working with your hands?
  • Would you enjoy a career where you interact with others (patients and colleagues)?
  • Are you willing to spend at least 8 years in college (4+ years for B.A./B.S. and 4 years in dental school)?

If you answered yes to these questions, a career in dentistry may be a good fit for you! ​​

Holland Interest Code 

The interest code for dentists is IRS (Investigative, Realistic, Social).

What's a Holland Code? This refers to a career assessment that measures your personality type across 6 areas: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. A Holland Code allows you to connect your personality directly with occupations! Find out your code at mynextmove.org/explore/ip​​​


Occupation Basics 

​Job Titles
Median Wages*
Required Education
  • ​General Dentist 
  • Pediatric Dentist
  • ​Orthodontist 
  • Oral Surgeon 
​​In CA: $125,860

In LA/OC Area: $112,390

** For more information visit CareerOneStop.org/Salary

​Doctorate Degree: 
  • ​Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)
  • Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)​


Choosing a Major for Dentistry10.png

There is no required undergraduate major for dental school, and “Pre-Dental” is not a common undergraduate major. To apply to dental school, you will need to complete certain prerequisite courses in science and math. Therefore, common undergraduate majors for students interested in dentistry include:

  • ​Biology, microbiology, molecular biology, genetics, or biochemistry
  • Math, physics, or chemistry

Sample Prerequisite Courses
In general, all prerequisite courses should be taken for a letter grade. Some campuses may have policies regarding whether the requirements can be met through community college coursework.​​

​Common Dental School Prerequisites 
​SCC Courses 
​One year of English
​ENGL 101 & ENGL 102 or 103 ​
​One year of biology 
​​​BIOL 211, 221, & 231
​One year of general chemistry
​​CHEM 200A & 200B 
​One year of organic chemistry
​​​CHEM 280A & 280B
One year of physics ​​
​​​PHYS 250A-C*
*Some campuses may accept PHYS 150A-B. Refer to program-specific websites.

​​IMPORTANT: This list is meant to be used as an informational guide. All students must refer to the individual campuses or programs for specific information on prerequisite requirements.


Preparing for Dental School 

As an undergraduate student, there are several things you can do now to prepare for dental school:

  • ​​​Maintain a high GPA.
  • Gain experience in the dental field. Consider seeking out a dentist in a private practice to shadow. Not sure where to start? You can begin with your family dentistry who may be able to accept volunteers or suggest colleagues. You can also gain broader experience in the healthcare field through programs like:
    • UCLA's Pre-Medical Enrichment Program (PREP)
    • USC's Bridging the Gaps summer program​
  • Join a pre-dental club, or start one if it doesn’t already exist at your college!  
  • Develop your leadership skills through student organizations and/or community service.
  • Connect with faculty and professionals. Remember that most programs will require multiple letters of recommendation.
  • Study for the standardized test(s) required for the programs you will be applying to (i.e. DAT).​​

​Professional Organizations 

Podcasts 

​​Related Occupations 

Not sure becoming a dentist is the right fit for you? Here are some related careers with different educational requirements. For more healthcare-related careers, visit ExploreHealthCareers.org.

​Job Title 
​Median Wages in CA
​Required Education
Holland Code​

​Dental Assistant
​$38,740
​Certificate
​CRS
​Dental Hygienist 
​$102,510
​Associate's Degree
​SRC



​​​Becoming a Veterinarian Untitled design (7).png

Veterinarians are professionals who diagnose medical problems and care for pets and farm animals. While most veterinarians work in private practice, there are many others who are involved in preventive medicine, laboratory animal medicine, research and development, and teaching. There are also multiple specializations within veterinary medicine.

Is Veterinary Medicine the Right Career for You?

Start by answering the following questions:
  • Do you enjoy learning about animals and science?
  • Are you a disciplined, hard worker?
  • Would you enjoy a career where you interact with others (pet owners and colleagues)?
  • Would you be comfortable taking care of sick animals and performing euthanasia?
  • Are you willing to spend at least 8 years in college (4+ years for B.A./B.S. and 4 years in veterinary school)?
If you answered yes to these questions, a career in veterinary medicine may be a good fit for you!


Occupation Basics 

​Sample Job Title
​Median Wages*
​Required Education
  • ​Veterinarian
  • Emergency Veterinarian
  • Equine Veterinarian
  • Veterinary Surgeon
  • Theriogenologist​
​In CA: $107,880+
In LA/OC Area: $107,960+​

​*For more information visit CareerOneStop.org/Salary​

​Doctorate Degree:
  • ​​Doctor of Veterinary Medicine​


Choosing a Major for Veterinary Medicine
There is no required undergraduate major for veterinary school, and “Pre-Veterinary” is not a common undergraduate major. To apply to veterinary school, you will need to complete certain prerequisite courses in science and math. Therefore, common undergraduate majors include:
  • Animal science, animal biology, or zoology
  • Biology, microbiology, molecular biology, genetics, or biochemistry​
Sample Prerequisite Courses
In general, all prerequisite courses should be taken for a letter grade. Some campuses may have policies regarding whether the requirements can be met through community college coursework.​

​Common Vet School Prerequisites 
​SCC Courses 
​One year English 
​ENGL 101 & 102 or 103
​One year of biology 
​BIOL 211, 221, & 231
​One year of general chemistry
​CHEM 200A & 200B
​One year of organic chemistry 
​CHEM 280A & 280B
​One year of physics 
PHYS 250A-C*
​*Some campuses may accept PHYS 150A-B. Refer to program-specific websites.


Preparing for Veterinary School
​Is an undergraduate student, there are several things you can do now to prepare for veterinary school:

  • ​Maintain a high GPA.
  • Gain as much broad and varied exposure to veterinary medicine as possible. Veterinary programs place great importance on these experiences. Here are some examples:
    • ​Consider job shadowing veterinarians in both large and small practices
    • Shadowing or working in a lab/research setting
    • Working or volunteering on a farm, ranch, zoo, or shelter
  • Join a pre-vet club, or start one if it doesn’t already exist at your college!  
  • Connect with faculty and professionals. Remember that most programs will require multiple letters of recommendation.
  • Study for the standardized test(s) required for the programs you will be applying to (i.e. GRE; MCAT).​
Professional Organizations 
Podcasts 

Related Occupations 


Not sure becoming a veterinarian is the right fit for you? Here are some related careers with different educational requirements. For more healthcare-related careers, visit ExploreHealthCareers.org.

​Job Title ​
Median Wages in CA​​Required Education
​Holland Code
​Veterinary Technician
​$40,020

​Associate's Degree
​RI
​Animal Caregiver
​$26,320

​~HS Diploma

​RC


​​​​​​​​​Becoming a Pharmacist Untitled design (8).png

Pharmacy is the science and practice of the preparation, formulation, and dispensing of medicinal drugs. Common Area of Confusion: Another health field, Pharmacology, is often confused with Pharmacy. Pharmacology is focused on the study of how a drug affects the biological system and how the body responds.

Holland Interest Code 
The interest code for pharmacists​ is ICS (Investigative, Conventional, Social).

What's a Holland Code? This refers to a career assessment that measures your personality type across 6 areas: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. A Holland Code allows you to connect your personality directly with occupations! Find out your code at mynextmove.org/explore/ip​​​​​

Is Pharmacy the Right Career for You?
Start by answering the following questions:
  • Do you enjoy learning about the human body and science?
  • Are you a disciplined, hard worker?
  • Do you have a good attention to detail?
  • Would you enjoy a career with a high level of interaction with patients and colleagues?
  • Are you willing to spend at least 8 years in college (4+ years for B.A./B.S. and 4 years in pharmacy school)?
If you answered yes to these questions, a career in pharmacy may be a good fit for you!

Occupation Basics 
​Sample Job Title 

​Median Wages*
Required Education​
  • ​Clinical Pharmacist
  • Hospital Pharmacist
  • Pharmacist in Charge​
​In CA: $144,660+
In LA/OC Area: $141,240+

*For more information visit CareerOneStop.org/Salary
​Doctorate Degree:
  • ​Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)​

Choosing a Major for Pharmacy 
There is no required undergraduate major for pharmacy school; however, some schools may offer a major in pharmaceutical sciences, pharmaceutical chemistry, or pharmacology. To apply to pharmacy school, you will need to complete certain prerequisite courses in science and math. Therefore, other common undergraduate majors for students interested in pharmacy include:
  • Biology, microbiology, molecular biology, genetics, or biochemistry
  • ​Math, physics, or chemistry​​

Sample Pre-Requisite Courses 

In general, all prerequisite courses should be taken for a letter grade. Some campuses may have policies regarding whether the requirements can be met through community college coursework.

​​Common Pharmacy School Prerequisites  
​SCC Courses 
​One year of English 
​ENGL 101 & 102 or 103
​One year of biology 
​BIO​​L 211, 221, & 231
​One year of general chemistry ​
​CHEM 200A & 200B
​One year of organic chemistry ​
​CHEM 280A & 280B
​One course in calculus 
​MATH 180 ​


IMPORTANT: This list is meant to be used as an informational guide. All students must refer to the individual campuses or programs for specific information on prerequisite requirements. Information can also be found at www.aacp.org.

Preparing for Pharmacy School 

As an undergraduate student, there are several things you can do now to prepare for pharmacy school:

  • ​​Maintain a high GPA.
  • ​Gain experience in the pharmacy profession through volunteering, interning, or taking a summer job in a pharmacy or healthcare setting.
  • Join a pre-pharmacy club, or start one if it doesn't already exist at your college!
  • Develop your leadership skills through student organizations and/or community service.​
  • ​Connect with faculty and professionals. Remember that most programs will require multiple letters of recommendation.
  • Study for the standardized test(s) required for the programs you will be applying to (i.e. PCAT; GRE).

Professional Organizations 

Podcasts 

Related Occupations 

Not sure becoming a pharmacist is the right fit for you? Here are some related careers with different educational requirements. For more healthcare-related careers, visit ExploreHealthCareers.org.

​Job Titles ​
​Median Wages in CA​
​Required Education
​Holland Code
​Pharmacy Technician 
​$40,120​
​​~High School Diploma 
​​CR
​Registered Nurse 
​$104​,410
​​Associate's Degree
​SIC​


​​​Becoming a NurseUntitled design (9).png  
Nurses promote health, prevent disease,​​ and help patients cope with illness. They have a unique scope of practice and can practice independently, although they also collaborate with all members of the health care team to provide the care needed by each patient as an individual. 

Holland Interest Code 
The interest code for nurses is SIC (Social, Investigative, & Conventional).

What's a Holland Code? This refers to a career assessment that measures your personality type across 6 areas: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. A Holland Code allows you to connect your personality directly with occupations! Find out your code at mynextmove.org/explore/ip​​​​​

Is Nursing the Right Career for You?
Start by answering the following questions:
  • Do you enjoy learning about the human body and science?
  • Are you a disciplined, hard worker and able to manage your time effectively?
  • Are you both patient and flexible? ​
  • Are you a critical thinker?
  • Would you enjoy a career with a high level of interaction with patients and colleagues?
If you answered yes to these questions, a career in nursing may be a good fit for you!

​Choosing the Nursing Path for You

Although an entry-level nurse can find a job with a three-year RN degree, there is a growing national movement to require all nurses to hold a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. 

Here are the types of nursing programs:

  • Certificate program 
    • ​​Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN)
    • ​Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)
  • ​​Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN)
  • Bachelor's Degree in Nursing (BSN)
    • Already have a bachelor's degree in another subject? Consider an Accelerated Bachelor's ​of Science in Nursing (ABSN)
Admission to all nursing programs is competitive. Being open to options such as private and out-of-state schools may expand your chances of getting into nursing school. To research national programs, click here

Sample Pre-Requisite Courses 
In general, all prerequisite courses should be taken for a letter grade. 

​Common Nursing School Pre-Requisites
​SCC Courses 
​Anatomy 
​BIOL 239
​Physiology 
​​BIOL 249
​Microbiology
​BIOL 229

​Statistics
​​MATH 219
​Chemistry 
Varies by nursing program
  • ADN Programs: Some programs may not require a chemistry course while others may award points for chemistry coursework
  • CSU Schools: Typically a chemistry course that is: general, inorganic, organic or integrated with associated lab.
  • UC Schools: May want general chemistry and a semester of organic chemistry (CHEM 200A, 200B, 280A). 
Be sure to check individual campus requirements to determine if chemistry is required and which course(s) are best to take. 

IMPORTANT: This list is meant to be used as an informational guide. All students must refer to the individual campuses or programs for specific information on prerequisite requirements. 

Preparing for Nursing School 

As an SCC student, there are several things you can do now to prepare for nursing school:
  • ​​Maintain a high GPA.
  • Research nursing programs and requirements.
  • ​Gain experience in the nursing profession through volunteering, interning or taking a summer job in a healthcare setting.
  • Study for the standardized test(s) required for the programs you will be applying to (i.e. TEAS).
​Resources 

Related Occupations 

Not sure becoming a nurse is the right fit for you? Here are some related careers with different educational requirements. For more healthcare-related careers, visit ExploreHealthCareers.org.

​​Job Titles ​
​Median Wages in CA​
​Required Education
​Holland Code
​Emergency Medical Technicians
​$36,970
​Certificate
​SIR​
​Medical Assistant 
​$37,640
​Certificate
SCR​
​Physician Assistants
​$124,780
​Master's Degree
SIR​


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staff

location
​Location:
D-Building, Room-106
Phone
E-mail: career@sccollege.edu

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Faculty & Employer Resources ​

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Career Counseling for Future SCC Students 
For Career & Major Exploration Resouces for High School Students, click here. 










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