From: Freidenrich, Leah
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 2:40 PM
To: # All SCC Email Users
Subject: Lecture/Discussion Series Upcoming

Please join us for one or all of this series of lectures and book discussion.  Students are encouraged to attend the reading and book signing by John West.  All other programs are limited to faculty and staff.   

 

There are always blue skies by John West.  Reading and book signing.

Tuesday March 14, 12:30-2:00 in D-101

                      

Book available for check-out from the Library and copies available for purchase at the time of the program.

 

Book Description

The information contained in this book has both anthropological and sociological implications. As we look at American society longitudinally, it is significant to note the changes that have occurred over the past half-century. This is not to indicate that things are even near where they should be in an enlightened culture. But the movement is in the right direction. Many of the social dynamics of the 40's, 50's and 60's are all but alien to the newer generations. But we are not out of the woods by a long shot, and what happened before is an indelible part of our history that students need to know to ensure that history does not repeat itself.

 

 

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American Sphinx : The Character of Thomas Jefferson (Vintage) American Sphinx: the character of Thomas Jefferson by J. Ellis

                        Discussion led by Scott Howell

                        Thursday April 13th 1:00-2:15

                        Room E-107

Discussion of Jeffersonian America with our own historian, Scott Howell, from the History department leading the discussion.  This book can be purchased from  www.amazon.com  in print, audio or downloadable electronic format; used copies available.  Join is for what promises to be a lively session!

                       

Opening excerpt from the book:

It was a provincial version of the grand entrance.  On June 20, 1775 Thomas Jefferson arrived in Philadelphia in an ornate carriage called a phaeton, along with four houses and three slaves…As the newest and youngest member of Virginia’s delegation to the Continental Congress, he obviously intended to uphold the stylish standard of the Virginia gentry, which the Philadelphia newspapers had recently described with a mixture of admiration and apprehension as “…those haughty sultans of the South.”

 

Includes chapters on Jefferson’s time in Paris, and the scandal of his lifelong relationship with one of his slaves, Sally Hemings.  Join us for a lively discussion on classic title by one of America’s foremost historical writers.

 

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Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

Discussion led by Nooshan Rafii

Thursday May 11, 1; 00-2:15

Room E-107

 

Discussion of wartime Afghanistan with one of our newest faculty members, Nooshan Rafii, leading the discussion.  This book can be purchased from www.amazon.com  in print, audio or downloadable electronic format; used copies available.  Join is for what promises to be a lively session!

 

 Book Description

The story of the friendship of two boys in Kabul, Afganistan: The Kite Runner follows the story of Amir, the privileged son of a wealthy businessman in Kabul, and Hassan, the son of Amir's father's servant. As children in the relatively stable Afganistan of the early 1970s, the boys are inseparable. They spend idyllic days running kites and telling stories of mystical places and powerful warriors until an unspeakable event changes the nature of their relationship forever.

 

Opening excerpt from the book:

I became what I am today at the age of twelve on a frigid overcast day in the winter of 1975.  I remember the precise moment, crouching behind a crumbling mud wall, peeking into the alley near the frozen creek.  That was a long time ago, but it’s wrong what they say about the past, I’ve learned about how you can bury it.  Because the past claws its way out.  Looking back now I realize I have been peeking into that deserted alley for the past twenty-six years.